2019: Whitefish Point Marathon

The process of 2018 Chicago Marathon was a memorable experience on many fronts. It was my first time following a well-written training plan, sticking with a nutrition regimen, finding semblance of work-life balance and at the end of about 20 weeks later … running start-to-finish on race day to earn a 26-minute PR. As in most such experiments where the arrow of time flows purely in one direction, there wasn’t an opportunity for do overs. But a post-partum (yes, partum instead of mortem – it was the birth of a new experience and not just the completion of an event) analysis revealed a list of things I should have tried and I could have done better.

  1. Consistent strength training
  2. Warming up before and cooling down after each run
  3. Running baggage free or in other words, purposeful/mindful running
  4. Improving running technique and efficiency
  5. 800 m (and longer distance) repeats during speed work
  6. More tempo, pace and progression runs
  7. More training runs at race length or longer
  8. Swimming, biking and/or yoga for active rest
  9. Minimal (preferably, no) nutrition experimentation on race day
  10. Post-marathon recovery training plan

Being of the scientific bend, it made me naturally curious. Looking through the log, I had weight ~157 lbs on race day for 2015 Marquette Marathon (4:06:16) as well as 2018 Chicago Marathon (3:40:05). Classifying the progress in and contributions from work-life balance, sleeping and eating habits as intangibles, I could attribute the 26-minute improvement in time to the training plan. I am fully aware that this is an over-simplification of a wholistic and inter-connected process but it’s a model. Given the extent of progress (and the result) over just 20 weeks of 2018 Chicago Marathon training in spite of many little things I didn’t do correctly or well, the BIG set of questions was: how much more could I improve if I

  1. kept up running (in addition to cross country skiing) in winter on a regular basis, cautiously pushed the envelope to increase the length and quality of each workout, made room in the schedule for I should have tried things and did I could have done better things better,
  2. continued pre-habing with help from the HandlerHillRossStarksTempleVertin healthcare enterprise,
  3. made intermittent fasting (at least the 16/8 variant if 20/4 becomes unsustainable in light of increased mileage) an everyday thing, improved the quality of ingredients that makes my food and limited alcohol intake (average of 1 pint/week or less), dropped few more pounds by week #12 and kept them off to verify the empirical relationship: every dropped pound of body weight results in approximately 1 minute improvement in marathon finish time (within reason and understanding that there’s a point of diminishing returns, as Ray Sharp first and Amby Burfoot later pointed out),
  4. coupled my blind faith in the training plan with an understanding of the underlying scientific rationale, thanks to the DurocherElesLarsonMillerSchwartzSharp kinesio-physio-athletic enterprise, and in turn, was more mindful during each activity, and
  5. practiced detachment – making self-care a higher priority without turning into a selfish douche bag – as the next level of letting things go?

The plan … the was changed and changed again

In the absence of a post-marathon recovery training plan (I didn’t see the need for one back then), my plan was to start training for the 45th American Birkebeiner (or Birkie) festivities from the very next day. In hindsight, I am glad I let that inexperienced idea go. So, the plan was modified and finalized: take a couple weeks of down time after the 2018 Chicago Marathon, read a good book (or two), watch a good documentary (or three) and from early November, start the 18-week training towards the 2019 Great Bear Chase.

I had found a very good book to read. I had stumbled across a wonderful documentary to watch. I had even signed up for the Whitefish Point Marathon in June to keep my winter running efforts honest. Great Bear Chase training was to begin shortly. I had invested in Salomon SpeedSpike CS to have confident footing during winter runs. I found that getting out of the door was often the hardest par and once I got moving, the miles went by with ease. I was set for 2018-19 winter. Or so I thought!

I believe I had one-click purchased this book by following iTunes’ recommendation after completing some other one. Though the title/sub-title combo – Let Your Mind Run: A Memoir of Thinking My Way to Victory – got all my attention, I didn’t know Deena Kastor even existed … let alone who she was or what she had accomplished. But I started once Mike Young suggested I should read it and it had a flow. So much so that I found it difficult to put down and read it twice. I have read it a few more times since then and Deena was more than kind enough to even sign my copy! In the process of reading this lovely book, I learned much about Deena, the re-birth of the American distance running program, behind-the-scenes lives of elite athletes and coaches and bite-sized chunks of usable of information that could potentially improve me as a runner, student and teacher.

The documentary I stumbled across, Run Free, was very well made and produced. It too offered several bite-sized bits of usable information that could make me lighter and faster on trails. Gaining facial recognition for many, if not all, of the characters in Christopher McDougall’s Born To Run, the second and subsequent readings yielded a much better understanding. Going down the research article rabbit hole, these two led me to more books and documentaries. Authors of many of these books (Hal Higdon, Roger Robinson and Kathrine Switzer so far) too were kind enough to sign my copies!

The new plan

Information gathered from what I read, saw and/or discussed had changed the course of things by mid-December: I no longer planned wished to race any ski events during 2018-19 winter. My intent, instead, was to focus on running and get better at it. The Whitefish Point Marathon in June would be the first of two racing days of 2019 and I’d use

  1. Hal Higdon‘s Advanced 2 Plan to train for the Whitefish Point Marathon. The choice of training plan came from believing in John‘s claim that I had been good enough to use Advanced 1 Plan for 2018 Chicago. The modifications I made to the plan were
    1. to swap Saturday-Sunday workouts each week,
    2. thanks to discussions with
      1. Hal, add a 2nd super-easy aerobic base and volume building run on easy days,
      2. Stephen, extend easy and LSD workouts by 10-20% to further build the aerobic base and volume,
      3. myself, extend the easy run (with a super-easy component) by 75-100% if a 2nd workout wasn’t feasible for some reason,
    3. thanks to discussions with Ray and in line with Hal‘s plan, add the progression component to LSD workouts,
    4. add sufficient warm-up and cool-down for tempo runs, race pace runs and speed work, and
    5. from prior notes and experiences, train the full distance a handful of times and go beyond at least once.
  2. the first 4 weeks of Advanced 2 Plan as Prep Work to be karmically faithful to the 2019 Spring semester students of my UN5390: Scientific Computing course.
  3. cross-country skiing or biking to either complement or as substitute for running whenever the conditions permitted.
  4. Grandma’s Marathon in Duluth, MN, as a backup couple weeks afterwards.
  5. Hal’s Advanced Post-Marathon Recovery Plan for 3-5 weeks after the event to heal before moving on to the second racing day of 2019 in October.

In line with the BIG set of questions, I managed to run about 300 miles after Chicago Marathon until the New Year’s eve in addition to some cross-country skiing and very minimal indoor biking. Thanks to the DurocherElesLarsonMillerSchwartzSharp kinesio-physio-athletic enterprise, I had a better understanding of the structure of the training plans – specifically, of periodization:

  1. 18-week plan split into 16 weeks of build-up and 2 weeks of taper
  2. 16 weeks of build-up split into 4 blocks of 4 weeks
  3. Each 4-week block includes 3 weeks of ramp-up and 1 week of step-back

With this understanding, it made sense to opt for a 4-week pre-training period. Instead of re-inventing the wheel, I opted to use the first 4-week block of training period for pre-training. It gave me sufficient time to experiment with workouts, routes, rest and nutrition.

Summary
Distance in miles and time in h:mm:ss


#


Session
Planned
Completed
Time
01 Pre-training
4 weeks
2019-01-07 - 2019-02-03
125.50
113.49
24:41:42
02 Training
18 weeks
2019-02-04 - 2019-06-09
713.20
546.36
98:43:23
03 Total training
22 weeks
2019-01-07 - 2019-06-09
838.70
659.85
123:25:05
If you are short of time and/or don’t have the desire to look through the pre-training and training activities on a week by week basis for 22 weeks, don’t worry. I’ve got you covered. Just glance over the summary table!

The discrepancy in planned and completed mileage during pre-training indicates that I didn’t really do every activity as planned. However, these 4 weeks helped me learn (a) that I could push the mileage within reason, (b) to put my ego aside and be ok with using skiing (or even indoor biking) when the weather conditions weren’t safe (thanks Jan – for convincing me that if I skied correctly, the fitness would transfer over to running with ease), (c) that giving up alcohol and minimizing sugar intake until the race day would be wise and beneficial.

WRITE ABOUT TRAINING PERIOD AFTER THE MARATHON IS FINISHED. WRITE ABOUT TRAINING PERIOD AFTER THE MARATHON IS FINISHED. WRITE ABOUT TRAINING PERIOD AFTER THE MARATHON IS FINISHED. WRITE ABOUT TRAINING PERIOD AFTER THE MARATHON IS FINISHED. WRITE ABOUT TRAINING PERIOD AFTER THE MARATHON IS FINISHED. WRITE ABOUT TRAINING PERIOD AFTER THE MARATHON IS FINISHED. WRITE ABOUT TRAINING PERIOD AFTER THE MARATHON IS FINISHED. WRITE ABOUT TRAINING PERIOD AFTER THE MARATHON IS FINISHED.

If you are the kind that needs more information than a week by week summary (say, my notes about each training activity), feel free to review my public Garmin Connect or Strava accounts, or my handwritten notes in a binder dedicated to this event. You’ll have to come by my house in Houghton though!

Pre-Training

Notation: Easy (E) | Hill (H) | Long (L) | Race (R) | Speed (S) | Tempo (T) | XTrain (X)
Distance in miles and time in h:mm:ss
Wk Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun
Week Season
P1 01/07
E 3.00
3.50
1:22:34
01/08
H 5.00
-
-
01/09
E 3.00
8.18
2:09:39
01/10
T 4.50
3.13
0:38:50
01/11
Rest
-
-
01/12
L 10.00
9.53
1:31:57
01/13
R 5.00
7.45
1:28:27
30.50
31.79
7:11:27
30.50
31.79
7:11:27
 


Seeley Hills Classic SISU Ski Fest (P01D06)

I signed up for the Seeley Hills Classic in Cable, WI, in 2018 October hoping it would increase my familiarity with the Birkie Trail system. In turn, I hoped it would improve my Korte time a few weeks down the road. But general lack of snow and more than occasional rain in led to organizers shrinking the Seeley course. The final update, that came at the speed for Oppligers (trust me, it's faster), hinted at hard and fast trails for the event - a no match for my current skill set. In lieu of plastering myself to an off-trail tree or breaking a few bones, I chose to participate in the Heikki Lunta 15 km (thanks to Christine for the distance recommendation) as part of SISU Ski Fest in Ironwood, MI. The weekend turned into a weekend getaway in Wisconsin's Northwoods with the Oppligers (Shawn and Doug) and Greens (Kim and Greg). My newly acquired instant pot made the trip too!

After a hearty home-cooked meal and a full night of sleep, Kim and I were dropped off at the ABR Trails. My wave was the last one start and the start was delayed by a few minutes as one of the participants needed medical attention. I fell a few times over the first 3 km but recent lessons in skate skiing helped me stay upright rest of the way until I crossed the finish line. Trail conditions were good and so was volunteer support all along the course. My official time of 1:31:34, albeit 90 some seconds more than my goal, was good enough for 49/102 overall, 35/62 in gender and 4/7 in AG. After another home-cooked hearty dinner, a full night of sleep and yummy breakfast, we all headed back to the Yoop but with a pit stop in Ironwood ... to ski some more in Wolverine Ski Trails. Weather and trail conditions were excellent. Shawn and Kim were kind enough to give up a bit of their time to coach me some more ... to improve my skate skiing!

P2 01/14
E 3.00
7.35
1:20:52
01/15
T 4.50
7.12
1:14:48
01/16
E 3.00
9.69
1:38:19
01/17
R 3.00
10.96
1:57:06
01/18
Rest
-
-
01/19
L 11.00
-
-
01/20
E 5.00
16.48
2:45:37
29.50
51.60
8:56:42
60.00
83.39
16:08:09
 
P3 01/21
E 3.00
6.39
1:02:51
01/22
S 6.00
6.36
1:10:44
01/23
E 3.00
10.64
2:00:35
01/24
T 4.50
-
1:30:00
01/25
Rest
-
-
01/26
L 8.00
-
-
01/27
R 6.00
-
-
30.50
23.39
5:44:10
90.50
106.78
21:52:19
 


Noquemanon Ski Marathon (P03D06)

Owing to the start of the new semester anxiety and stress, I didn't sleep nearly enough during P02-P03. Neither did I injest enough nutrition into the body to account for the increased effort. In addition, I probably didn't use the appropriate form or technique while using the Yooper Scooper to shovel many inches of snow. All this led to quite a noticeable fatigue, body ache and joint stiffness. Prevailing colder temperatures didn't really help either. Even with an extra day's rest, I found energy levels to lower than usual.

I have little problem not starting something but can't stand the thought of not finishing something that I have started ... until I am certain that I've given it my best effort and a bag of chips. I was pretty proud of warding off any last minute mind over body urges to participate in this ski event that could have potentially derailed the training for the major event in June. The weekend trip to Marquette with Kim and Greg and Ben and Lianna turned into one of rest and recouperation. Some of this down time was also used to re-assess the extra workout idea, necessary nutrition and rest once the training begins on Monday, 4th February 2019.

P4 01/28
E 3.00
-
-
01/29
H 5.00
-
-
01/30
E 3.00
-
-
01/31
T 5.00
-
0:45:00
02/01
Rest
-
-
02/02
L 13.00
6.71
2:04:23
02/03
R 6.00
-
-
35.00
6.71
2:49:23
125.50
113.49
24:41:42
 

Training

Notation: Easy (E) | Hill (H) | Long (L) | Race (R) | Speed (S) | Tempo (T) | XTrain (X)
Distance in miles and time in h:mm:ss
Wk Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun
Week Season
01 02/04
E 3.00
3.64
0:45:09
02/05
H 5.00
5.30
1:00:48
02/06
E 3.00
11.15
1:45:42
02/07
T 4.50
10.18
1:11:00
02/08
Rest
-
-
02/09
L 10.00
25.68
4:27:44
02/10
R 5.00
7.76
1:16:34
30.50
63.71
10:26:57
30.50
63.71
10:26:57
 


Vasaloppet Ski Marathon (W01D06) and North End Classic (W01D07)

If not for friends in high places (or as in this case, the highest of places), there was little chance that I'd even know about this event - let alone be a participant. Alice had not only won the 58 km freestyle edition in 2017 Vasaloppet USA in Mora, MN, but had gone on to be the first US female to complete the 90 km edition in 2018 Vasaloppet in Mora, Sweden. She believed that I was good enough to complete the 42 km Classic and so, I believed in her belief and signed up for the 2019 edition. The longest ski outing of my life yet, 42 km, took 4:27:07 and was good enough for 160/187 overall, 122/140 in gender and 26/28 in AG. The official time in North End Classic 12.5 km - a scenic pit stop and a recovery ski adventure - was 1:16:30 and good enough for 42/61 overall, 27/38 in gender and 1/2* in AG.

Read more about these events in a complete recap here .

02 02/11
E 3.00
-
0:45:00
02/12
T 4.50
-
0:45:00
02/13
E 3.00
9.83
2:23:07
02/14
R 3.00
-
-
02/15
Rest
-
-
02/16
L 11.00
17.42
3:30:26
02/17
E 5.00
16.11
2:56:52
29.50
43.36
10:20:25
60.00
107.07
20:47:22
 
03 02/18
E 3.00
-
-
02/19
S 6.00
-
-
02/20
E 3.00
-
1:00:00
02/21
T 4.50
-
-
02/22
Rest
17.77
2:36:39
02/23
L 8.00
-
-
02/24
E 6.00
1.22
0:18:55
30.50
18.99
3:55:34
90.50
126.06
24:42:56
 


American Birkebeiner Kortelopet (W03D05)

140 km base training [for a ~30 km event] seems low ... remarked Jan Haase in the aftermath of 2018 Birkie festivities. Consciously work on your downhills and turns ... suggested another Jan a month or so later in Washington, DC, during the 2018 Spring Meeting of CASC. How much base training would have been sufficient? ... I inquired the encyclopediac minds in and around our community. Deciphering their collective answer, though led me down an entirely new rabbit hole of time-based training, hinted towards a training plan that included some long/long-ish outings. Coupling that with the sneak peak I got into Jessie Diggins' annual training plan, courtesy of The Olympic Coach of the Year, I settled on putting in at least 300 km of base training ahead of the event.

Given that I raced in an even that I had deemed as non-racing, I was quite happy with a finish time of 2:35:58 (263/1067 overall, 185/607 in gender, 4/18 in AG, 2/XXX overall in wave #3 and 1/XXX male in wave #3). It was about 57 minutes better than my time in 2018 (3:33:05, 575/885 overall, 361/492 in gender, 14/16 in AG; not sure about the placement within wave #3). I expected to and was confident that I'd finish a few ticks before the 3 hour mark. But to finish nearly 25 minutes ahead of proposed time was the stuff of double secret goals and would have remained just that without help from Mother Nature, groomers, volunteers, ski patrol, friends who taught me things and spectators.

Read more about this event in its own complete recap here.

04 02/25
E 3.00
-
-
02/26
H 5.00
4.73
2:19:17
02/27
E 3.00
4.54
0:47:16
02/28
T 5.00
11.97
1:59:22
03/01
Rest
5.04
0:48:37
03/02
L 13.00
-
-
03/03
R 6.00
4.11
0:54:24
35.00
30.39
6:48:56
125.50
156.45
31:31:52
 
05 03/04
E 3.00
-
-
03/05
T 5.00
3.06
0:42:27
03/06
E 3.00
4.41
0:48:06
03/07
R 3.00
-
-
03/08
Rest
-
-
03/09
L 14.00
15.58
2:11:27
03/10
E 7.00
7.09
1:10:50
35.00
30.14
4:52:50
160.50
186.59
36:24:42
 


Great Bear Chase (W05D06)

This too was an event I had deemed I am not going to race but much like Birkie two weekends ago, things changed and changed in a hurry. The last of the officially timed ski event for 2018-19 winter season, being held in our very own backyard in the good company many of my wonderful friends, sufficient knowledge of the course and its terrain gathered over the past 3-4 seasons with help from many said friends - to an extent that I feel at home on every loop and not just when I see the final stretch to the finish line, an opportunity rub shoulders with the elites, and a peroration for Pat Szubielak as he embarks on retirement a second time ... drove the said change.

The tracks/trails felt a little slow (especially in shaded areas) but it wasn't anything that any skier would/should complain about. I was fortunate enough to stay behind Makenna (#776) for about 5-7 km and Katie (#796) for another 3-5 km. Getting an opportunity to mimic their stride and strokes, energy-saving tactics and tehcniques was quite invaluable. The final 5 km proved to be the testing grounds of what I had learned from them on the fly. Plenty of sunshine, blue skies, little to negligible winds and a plethora of cheerful faces turned out to be the icing on the cake! The official finish time of 2:11:27 was good enough for 55/137 overall, 40/96 in gender and 4/8 in AG.

Read more about this event in its own complete recap here.

06 03/11
E 3.00
6.57
2:05:24
03/12
S 7.00
4.05
1:03:21
03/13
E 3.00
11.27
1:57:15
03/14
T 5.00
3.37
0:30:48
03/15
Rest
11.15
1:47:40
03/16
L 10.00
11.37
2:22:16
03/17
R 7.00
-
-
35.00
47.78
9:46:44
195.50
234.37
46:11:26
 

The end of this week marked the end of a third of the 18-week training program. I have about 100 km to go to achieve the seasonal goal in cross country skiing. I hope to get help from friends an use the kilometers to pick up (and refine) my current skill set for the 2019-20 winter. If winter continues like it did last year, LSD runs will be the long and easy ski sessions. If not, the skis will be put away shortly after reaching the goal and shift the focus to running.

Wk Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun
Week Season
07 03/18
E 3.00
10.27
2:11:29
03/19
H 5.50
10.03
1:41:12
03/20
E 4.00
12.58
2:38:46
03/21
T 5.50
-
-
03/22
Rest
-
0:45:00
03/23
L 16.00
17.08
2:57:55
03/24
R 8.00
-
-
42.00
49.96
10:14:22
237.50
284.33
56:25:48
 

Pushed the mileage up a little and built-in rest days when signs of fatigue or pain showed up. Warmer weather and dry roads in Virginia (as part of the CASC 2019 Spring Meeting) felt great to dress lighter and stretch the legs. One of the sessions, D02, turned into speed work as and when the traffic lights permitted and the sidewalk was mostly flat. A post-dinner conversation with John Towns and David Moses got me interested in and to sign up for the Illinois Marathon in W12 ... as a paid training run and potentially a dress rehearsal event.

08 03/25
E 3.00
7.08
1:03:04
03/26
T 5.50
7.19
1:05:42
03/27
E 4.00
20.73
2:35:40
03/28
R 3.00
7.20
1:06:55
03/29
Rest
10.26
1:48:50
03/30
L 17.00
8.04
1:31:09
03/31
E 8.00
12.56
1:58:43
40.50
73.06
11:10:03
278.00
357.39
67:35:51
 

Mileage - combined with about 30 miles of running, 10 miles of biking and rest XC skiing - was considerably high this week and I felt no ill effects or fatigue. D02 was the first formal tempo session and D04 was the first formal race pace run of this training program. Maybe a bit late in the game but I think the slow/easy runs and XC skiing sessions have been doing their thing in my body. Grateful for Spring-like weather and dry roads to run in lesser layers of clothing and road running shoes.

09 04/01
E 4.00
19.65
3:17:26
04/02
S 7.50
7.78
1:17:07
04/03
E 4.00
10.40
1:55:48
04/04
T 5.50
-
-
04/05
Rest
5.56
0:51:14
04/06
L 12.00
16.31
2:38:19
04/07
R 9.00
-
-
42.00
59.70
9:59:54
320.00
417.09
77:35:45
 

Observed that the body weight has been fluctuating a few pounds around the 160 lbs mark and hadn't necessarily moving in the direction I was hoping even with approximately 1.5 meals each day. Some of those meals (when I eat an entire bar of chocolate or a bag of energy bars) haven't been nearly health and that could likely be the culprit. I have also eaten meals when I haven't been entirely hugry - especially during W08 when the volume went considerably high. I feel like it's time to move the nutrition game up a notch: limit myself to 1 meal a day (a medium/big rich and colorful salad bowl only when I am really hungry), drastically cut out sugar and drink plenty more water.

D02 was the first formal speed work session of this training program. On D03, I found an article posted by Hal Higdon detailing some tips from Doug Kurtis - someone who has finished 200 marathons under the 3:00:00 mark. Finding similarities (I am yet to run one marathon below 3:30:00) between to my current approach - even if it appears OCD/intense to someone else - made me feel good and confident ... that I am on a tested and trustable path.

10 04/08
E 3.00
-
-
04/09
H 6.50
-
-
04/10
E 4.00
15.08
2:25:15
04/11
T 6.50
8.56
1:18:00
04/12
Rest
-
-
04/13
L 19.00
26.31
4:33:05
04/14
R 9.00
10.53
1:35:40
48.00
60.48
9:52:00
368.00
477.57
87:27:45
 

Ended up skipping/missing the last run of last week and first two runs of this week - some owing to procrastination (or rain) and some to let the minimal chafing from W09D06 LSD run heal completely. Observed on Wednesday that the cadence had gone up and around 170 spm without having to consciously work on it. It has become a bit easier to retain that cadence throughout the week without much effort. LSD on D06 was full length - Atlantic Mine, Stanton Township and their suburbs had plenty of snow and roads were icy. Race pace run on D07 was cut short by nearly 50% - not for loss of energy or focus but headwinds and extra layer of clothing.

11 04/15
E 4.00
10.43
1:50:50
04/16
T 6.50
10.17
1:36:44
04/17
E 5.00
5.01
0:57:38
04/18
R 4.00
8.26
1:11:02
04/19
Rest
-
-
04/20
L 20.00
27.25
4:29:19
04/21
E 10.00
7.67
1:10:05
49.50
68.79
11:15:38
417.50
546.36
98:43:23
 

Monday (D01) started with a day off from work to follow the progress of several friends participating in the 123rd edition of Boston Marathon. Watching Joan Benoit Samuelson's post-marathon interview validated Jan Haase's recommendation to use nordic skiing to not only save the legs and knees but improve lung capacity and upper body strength (Joan claims she is not an efficient skier which forces her to work harder ... which, in turn, builds her strength).

Building on W10's 60 miles and pushing 10-15%, I got very close to 70 miles this week (the highest mileage in any given week so far). I did take easy runs easy and go harder when the training plan called for it (I needed help to get out of the door and grateful for good friends who provided it). Ran a few ticks past the 27 mile mark on D06 (the longest recorded run yet of my life; the first time ever I have done marathon distance runs in back-to-back weekends), and ran to and through Boston ... founded over a century ago likely by fortune-seeking folks that moved here (and started/worked at Boston Mine/St. Mary's Mine) from Boston, MA, to feel at home. Attended Ray Sharp University (RSU) on Easter Sunday (D07) and learned more about (a) physiology, (b) training from event to another and (c) racing strategies.

12 04/22
E 4.00
-
-
04/23
S 8.00
-
-
04/24
E 5.00
-
-
04/25
T 6.50
-
-
04/26
Rest
-
-
04/27
L 12.00
-
-
04/28
R 6.00
-
-
41.50
0.00
0:00:00
459.00
546.36
98:43:23
 


Illinois Marathon (W12D06)

I first learned about this event some months ago from Patricia Gropp during the Women in HPC networking event as part of the SC18 festivities in Dallas, TX. I put it on the backburner of bucket list items that I'd make time down the road some time. But during the CASC Spring 2019 meeting (W07) in Alexandria, VA, the event re-surfaced again ... thanks to a post-dinner conversation with John Towns and David Moses. Once John explained festive atmosphere associated with Illinois Marathon - a big event in a small town America that features a course (and maybe even the weather) very similar to the one I am formally training towards in six weeks - it wasn't at all difficult to sign up. When the travel component is taken into account, this'd be a complete dress rehearsal. So, I made the necessary arrangements to run in the shadows of the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. (NCSA).



Read more about this event in its own complete recap here.

no images were found

Wk Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Sun
Week Season
13 04/29
E 4.00
-
-
04/30
H 7.00
-
-
05/01
E 5.00
-
-
05/02
T 7.00
-
-
05/03
Rest
-
-
05/04
L 20.00
-
-
05/05
R 10.00
-
-
53.00
0.00
0:00:00
512.00
546.36
98:43:23
 
14 05/06
E 5.00
-
-
05/07
T 6.50
-
-
05/08
E 5.00
-
-
05/09
R 5.00
-
-
05/10
Rest
-
-
05/11
L 12.00
-
-
05/12
E 6.00
-
-
39.50
0.00
0:00:00
551.50
546.36
98:43:23
 


Journeys Marathon (W14D06)

The half marathon associated with this event should have been my maiden half marathon when I got into running several years ago. Nancy and Josh had tried their best to convince me - to sign up and train. I did the easier of the two - signing up - for two years in a row. Instead of training accordingly to follow through and indeed make Eagle River, WI, site of my maiden half marathon, the town just became an occasional pit stop during adventures deep into the heart of Wisconsin ... until today.



Read more about this event in its own complete recap here.

no images were found

15 05/13
E 5.00
-
-
05/14
S 9.00
-
-
05/15
E 5.00
-
-
05/16
T 5.50
-
-
05/17
Rest
-
-
05/18
L 20.00
-
-
05/19
R 10.00
-
-
54.50
0.00
0:00:00
606.00
546.36
98:43:23
 
16 05/20
E 5.00
-
-
05/21
H 6.00
-
-
05/22
E 5.00
-
-
05/23
T 4.50
-
-
05/24
Rest
-
-
05/25
L 12.00
-
-
05/26
R 4.00
-
-
36.50
0.00
0:00:00
642.50
546.36
98:43:23
 
17 05/27
E 4.00
-
-
05/28
T 4.50
-
-
05/29
E 4.00
-
-
05/30
R 4.00
-
-
05/31
Rest
-
-
06/01
L 8.00
-
-
06/02
E 4.00
-
-
28.50
0.00
0:00:00
671.00
546.36
98:43:23
 
18 06/03
E 3.00
-
-
06/04
S 5.00
-
-
06/05
E 3.00
-
-
06/06
Rest
-
-
06/07
E 2.00
-
-
06/08
R 26.20
-
-
06/09
E 3.00
-
-
42.20
0.00
0:00:00
713.20
546.36
98:43:23
 

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Geographical spread of distance and time (prep work + training)
City County State
  Distance (miles) Time (h:mm:ss) Distance (miles) Time (h:mm:ss) Distance (miles) Time (h:mm:ss)
Bessemer 7.45 1:28:27  
Ironwood 9.53 1:31:57  
Gogebic County Total 16.98 3:00:24  
Atlantic Mine 17.84 2:46:49  
Calumet 70.00 13:11:20  
Hancock 43.56 7:07:38  
Houghton 408.82 79:00:29  
Klingville 10.53 1:35:40  
Houghton County Total 550.75 103:41:56  
Michigan Total 567.73 106:42:20
Mora 25.68 4:27:44  
Kanabec County Total 25.68 4:27:44  
Minnesota Total 25.68 4:27:44
Alexandria 22.61 5:04:58  
No County Total 22.61 5:04:58  
Virginia Total 22.61 5:04:58
Cable 8.98 1:35:29  
Bayfield County Total 8.98 1:35:29  
Coleman 17.08 2:57:55  
Marinette County Total 17.08 2:57:55  
Hayward 17.77 2:36:39  
Sawyer County Total 17.77 2:36:39  
Wisconsin Total 43.83 7:10:03
Season Total 659.85 123:25:05

Race Week

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Race Day

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26.22 mi, 3:04:59, 7:03 min/mile, 8.51 mph
Garmin Forerunner 935 and WP GPX Maps plugin for WordPress

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Goals (in order of importance) and their status
# Goal Status
01 Complete at least 5 full length training workouts (run and ski) Yes
02 Finish below 3:40:05 (minimum: 8:24 min/mile, 7.14 mph) and earn a PR Yes
03 Finish below 3:19:59 (minimum: 7:38 min/mile, 7.86 mph) Yes

Onto Chicago

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Thanks be to

the opportunities, organizers, sponsors, volunteers, timing folks, law enforcement/border patrol/immigration officials, photographers, fellow participants, spectators, technologists with their creative electronic gadgets and tools, and my good friends in and outside of my community for the often unexpected, undeserved, unrewarded acts of constant encouragement, and offerings of constructive criticism, tested tips and tricks to improve myself as an athlete.

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