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The story

An aurora (from the Latin word aurora, sunrise) is a natural light display in the sky particularly in the high latitude regions. It is caused by the collision of energetic charged particles with atoms in the high altitude atmosphere. The charged particles originate in the magnetosphere and solar wind and, on Earth, are directed by the Earth's magnetic field into the atmosphere.

In northern latitudes, the effect is known as the aurora borealis (or the northern lights), named after the Roman goddess of dawn, Aurora, and the Greek name for the north wind, Boreas, by Pierre Gassendi in 1621.

Auroras seen near the magnetic pole may be high overhead, but from farther away, they illuminate the northern horizon as a greenish glow or sometimes a faint red, as if the Sun were rising from an unusual direction.

Discrete aurora & aurora astralis

Discrete aurorae often display magnetic field lines or curtain-like structures, and can change within seconds or glow unchanging for hours, most often in fluorescent green. The aurora borealis most often occurs near the equinoctes.

Its southern counterpart, the aurora australis (or the southern lights), has almost identical features to the aurora borealis and changes simultaneously with changes in the northern auroral zone and is visible from high southern latitudes in Antarctica, South America, New Zealand, and Australia.

Aurorae occur on other planets. Similar to the Earth's aurora, they are visible close to the planet's magnetic poles.

In a 10 mile neighborhood ...

  1. Liquid Force
  2. Northern Lights
  3. Toad
  4. Northern Lights
  5. Wild Blue Phlox
  6. Jack In The Pulpit
  7. Curls
  8. Bead Lily
  9. White Baneberry
  10. Nodding Trillium

Dancing with the Stars
M-203, Hancock, MI 49930, USA


Archive ID
Date/Time
Location
Camera
Lens
Focal Length
Exposure
Shutter Speed
Aperture
ISO
Exp Bias
Flash
Filters
Light Value
HF Distance
Focus Distance
Depth of Field
Field of View
Tripod
Notes/Remarks
n2c_112-4015
2012-07-15 01:05:07 -0400
47.17512 N, -88.63397 E, 625 ft
NIKON D200
AF DX Fisheye-Nikkor 10.5mm f/2.8G ED
10.5 mm (35 mm equivalent: 15.0 mm)
Manual
30 second(s)
f/2.8
200
0
No
None
-2.9
1.87 m
1.33 m
3.77 m (0.78 - 4.55)
99.9 deg (3.18 m)
Yes
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