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What Are These Lights?

An aurora (plural: auroras or aurorae) is a natural light display in the sky particularly in the high latitude (Arctic and Antarctic) regions, caused by the collision of energetic charged particles with atoms in the high altitude atmosphere. The charged particles originate in the magnetosphere and solar wind and are directed by the Earth's magnetic field into the atmosphere.

In northern latitudes, the effect is known as the aurora borealis, named after the Roman goddess of dawn, Aurora, and the Greek name for the north wind, Boreas, by Pierre Gassendi in 1621. Auroras seen near the magnetic pole may be high overhead, but from farther away, they illuminate the northern horizon as a greenish glow or sometimes a faint red, as if the Sun were rising from an unusual direction. The aurora borealis most often occurs near the equinoxes. Its southern counterpart is known as the aurora australis.

Auroras result from emissions of photons in the Earth's upper atmosphere, above 50 miles, from ionized nitrogen atoms regaining an electron, and oxygen and nitrogen atoms returning from an excited state to ground state. They are ionized or excited by the collision of solar wind and magnetospheric particles being funneled down and accelerated along the Earth's magnetic field lines; excitation energy is lost by the emission of a photon of light, or by collision with another atom or molecule:

Oxygen emissions: green or brownish-red, depending on the amount of energy absorbed. Nitrogen emissions: blue or red. Blue if the atom regains an electron after it has been ionized. Red if returning to ground state from an excited state. Oxygen is unusual in terms of its return to ground state: it can take three quarters of a second to emit green light and up to two minutes to emit red. Collisions with other atoms or molecules will absorb the excitation energy and prevent emission.

Because the very top of the atmosphere has a higher percentage of oxygen and is sparsely distributed such collisions are rare enough to allow time for oxygen to emit red. Collisions become more frequent progressing down into the atmosphere, so that red emissions do not have time to happen, and eventually even green light emissions are prevented.

As such, there is a color differential with altitude; at high altitude oxygen red dominates, then oxygen green and nitrogen blue/red, then finally nitrogen blue/red when collisions prevent oxygen from emitting anything. Green is the most common of all auroras. Behind it is pink, a mixture of light green and red, followed by pure red, yellow (a mixture of red and green), and lastly pure blue.

Auroras are associated with the solar wind, a flow of ions continuously flowing outward from the Sun. The Earth's magnetic field traps these particles, many of which travel toward the poles where they are accelerated toward Earth. Collisions between these ions and atmospheric atoms and molecules cause energy releases in the form of auroras appearing in large circles around the poles. Auroras are more frequent and brighter during the intense phase of the solar cycle when coronal mass ejections increase the intensity of the solar wind.

In a 10 mile neighborhood ...

  1. Bead Lily
  2. Nodding Trillium
  3. Anemone
  4. White Baneberry
  5. Jack In The Pulpit
  6. Curls
  7. Liquid Force
  8. Canada Violet
  9. Ellie
  10. Need help with identification

Northern Lights
Jasberg St, Hancock, MI 49930, USA


Archive ID
Date/Time
Location
Camera
Lens
Focal Length
Exposure
Shutter Speed
Aperture
ISO
Exp Bias
Flash
Filters
Light Value
HF Distance
Focus Distance
Depth of Field
Field of View
Tripod
Notes/Remarks
n2c_111-4634
2011-08-06 00:08:42 -0400
47.14105 N, -88.6233 E, 615 ft
NIKON D200
AF DX Fisheye-Nikkor 10.5mm f/2.8G ED
10.5 mm (35 mm equivalent: 15.0 mm)
Manual
109.7 second(s)
f/2.8
100
0
No
None
-3.8
1.87 m
1.33 m
3.77 m (0.78 - 4.55)
99.9 deg (3.18 m)
Yes
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